Millet with red cabbage and turnips with Jerusalem artichoke carpaccio, walnuts, hazelnuts and sumac

October 30, 2020

Leaves in Autumn 

The red imprinted on the leaves is one of the colors that most brings me back to autumn. Oak, larch, pine, fir, birch, each with its own language mark the landscape with veins ranging from dark green to copper and from rust to carmine.
I wanted to capture the carmine note that always appears to me almost like a wound in the woods and translate it into a dish that could tell with sweetness and depth the notes that characterize this time of year.
A period that turns towards recollection, silence and meditation in preparation for the new gems.

Method

Rinse the turnips well and boil them in cold water (from when it boils, count about 20 ', also based on their size).
Cook the millet for absorption (ratio 1: 2) with star anise, cinnamon and a pinch of salt.
Meanwhile, wash and slice the thin cabbage.
Peel the boiled turnips, cut them into small cubes. In a wok, heat a few tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil and cook the cabbage together with the onion. After a few minutes add salt and let the vegetation water evaporate, taking care to stir often. Three quarters of the way through cooking, add the diced turnips, mix well and finish cooking.
Once the millet is cooked, add it to the cabbage and turnips, mixing well.

Wash and peel the Jerusalem artichokes, slice them thinly and season with a few drops of lemon and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Toast the walnuts and hazelnuts and crush them coarsely.
Wash the baby spinach.
Serve the millet with the carpaccio, helping yourself with a pasta bowl to shape the cereal. Complete with fresh baby spinach, walnuts and hazelnuts, a sprinkling of sumac and a few drops of lemon.
Preparation time about 16 hours
Recipe:  Millet with red cabbage and turnips with Jerusalem artichoke carpaccio, walnuts, hazelnuts and sumac

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